Cash Secured Puts vs Covered Calls: A Comparison

As an investor, I am always exploring different strategies to maximise my returns. Lately, I’ve delved into cash secured puts and covered calls, which are both popular options trading strategies among investors seeking income generation and stock acquisition at desired prices.

cash secured puts vs covered calls

In a cash secured put, I sell an out-of-the-money put option and keep enough cash in my account to purchase the underlying stock if the option is exercised. This strategy allows me to generate income through the premium received from the sold put option, and possibly buy the stock at a lower price if the option is exercised. On the other hand, a covered call involves owning shares of a stock and selling a call option against those shares. This enables me to generate additional income through the premium received, while potentially limiting my upside if the stock’s price appreciates beyond the option’s strike price.

While both strategies have their merits, it is important for me to consider my primary objectives, cost and return expectations, and market outlook before deciding which strategy suits my investment goals the best. By evaluating these factors, I can make a well-informed decision and potentially enhance my portfolio’s risk-adjusted performance.

Cash Secured Puts and Covered Calls Explained

What Is a Cash Secured Put?

A cash-secured put is an investment strategy that involves writing a put option on an underlying stock or ETF, while simultaneously putting aside the necessary cash to purchase the stock if assigned. This tactic is often used with the intention of generating short-term income or acquiring desired stocks at a more favourable price.

In a cash-secured put, I sell a put option and therefore collect the premium. If the stock price falls below the option’s strike price, I’ll have to buy the stock at that price, thus utilising the cash I set aside. If the stock price remains above the strike price, I keep the premium and let the put option expire worthless. This strategy suits a bullish outlook on the stock or ETF in question.

What Is a Covered Call?

On the other hand, a covered call involves writing or selling a call option on a stock that I already own, or covering the option by holding an equivalent amount of the underlying shares. The goal of this strategy is also to generate income, as I collect the premium by selling the call option.

By selling the call option, I’m agreeing to sell my shares at the strike price if the option buyer exercises the call. If the stock price stays below the strike price during the option’s lifespan, the option expires worthless, and I get to keep the premium. However, if the stock price rises above the strike price, the option will likely be exercised, and I’ll have to sell my shares at the agreed-upon price, potentially missing out on any further gains. This strategy is most appropriate when I have a neutral to slightly bullish outlook on the stock.

Both cash-secured puts and covered calls are common income-generating strategies utilised by investors. They share similarities and differences, with cash-secured puts focusing on creating income while potentially buying stocks at a lower price, whereas covered calls help generate income while agreeing to sell shares at an agreed price. In both cases, the strategies help mitigate risk and enhance potential returns when executed properly.

Executing the Strategies

How to Implement a Cash Secured Put

Implementing a cash secured put (CSP) begins with identifying a stock I am bullish on and would be happy to own for the long term. Since I am bullish, my goal is to use CSPs to generate income and potentially acquire the stock at a lower price than the current market value.

First, I select an out-of-the-money (OTM) put option with a strike price lower than the current stock price. The expiration date should be reasonable, usually within 1-3 months. The option premium received from selling the put will be added to my income.

For example, let’s say NIO is trading at £100, and I sell a put option with a £95 strike price expiring in 1 month. I receive £3 per share as an option premium. This income is mine to keep regardless of the stock price movement.

If NIO’s stock price stays above £95 at expiration, my put option will expire worthless, and I will have achieved my goal of generating income. However, if NIO’s stock price falls below £95, I may be obligated to buy the stock at the strike price of £95, which will add NIO to my portfolio at a lower cost.

How to Implement a Covered Call

A covered call involves holding a long stock position and selling a call option against it. This strategy works well for stocks I already own and would like to generate additional income from, or for stocks that have limited appreciation potential in the short term.

If I own 100 shares of a stock (e.g., NIO), I can sell a call option against those shares. Like with cash secured puts, I should select an OTM call option with a strike price higher than the current stock price. The expiration date should also be reasonable, usually within 1-3 months.

Continuing with our NIO example, let’s say I sell a call option with a £105 strike price expiring in 1 month, and I receive £3 per share as an option premium for this transaction. This income is mine to keep, regardless of the direction NIO’s stock price takes.

If NIO’s stock price remains below £105 until expiration, my call option will expire worthless, and I will have successfully generated income. If NIO’s stock price rises above £105, my shares may be “called away” or sold at the £105 strike price. This represents a missed opportunity for upside gains, but allows me to bank the profits and still keep the option premium.

In summary, both cash secured puts and covered calls are useful strategies for generating income and managing the risk and opportunity in my options trading.

Comparing Risk Profiles and Investment Objectives

Similarities between Cash Secured Puts and Covered Calls

Both cash secured puts and covered calls are options strategies that investors use to generate additional income, reduce net cost, and limit downside risk. They both involve selling options on an underlying asset and use time decay to their advantage. I understand that these strategies can provide a stable source of income for investors, especially for those in retirement or with a more conservative investment approach.

However, my maximum profit in both strategies is capped, and so, they might not be ideal for those seeking significant capital gains or long-term price appreciation. In both cash secured puts and covered calls, the breakeven point is the net cost of the investment, which includes the cost of the option and the agreed-upon strike price. Lastly, because of their focus on generating income and managing risk, these strategies are generally suitable for investors with a moderate risk tolerance.

Differences between Cash Secured Puts and Covered Calls

While the risk profiles and investment objectives of cash secured puts and covered calls have similarities, there are key differences between the two. For instance, a cash secured put is a bullish strategy wherein I sell a put option on an underlying asset and am willing to buy the shares if the option is exercised. My maximum loss is limited, as it is the difference between the agreed-upon strike price and the net premium received. However, a covered call is a more neutral strategy where I own the underlying shares and sell a call option. Here my maximum gain is determined by the option’s strike price, and I am obligated to sell the shares if the option is exercised, potentially incurring an opportunity cost.

In terms of market outlook, cash secured puts are better suited for bullish or mildly bullish markets, while covered calls are ideal for neutral or slightly bullish markets. They also have different ex-dividend date considerations; covered calls carry the risk of early assignment due to the ex-dividend date, while cash secured puts don’t carry this risk. Furthermore, cash secured puts require cash on hand equal to the amount needed to buy the shares at the agreed-upon strike price, while covered calls require ownership of the underlying asset.

In conclusion, although cash secured puts and covered calls share several similarities, their differences in terms of market outlooks, opportunity costs, and the underlying assets make them distinct strategies. By analysing my investment objectives, risk tolerance, and market outlook, I can choose the most suitable strategy to achieve my financial goals.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the main differences?

Between cash-secured puts and covered calls, there are similarities but also some key differences. With covered calls, I write a call option on a stock I already own and collect a premium. I agree to sell my shares at the strike price if the option is exercised. In contrast, with cash-secured puts, I write a put option and set aside enough cash to purchase the shares at the agreed-upon strike price if the option is exercised. In both cases, I collect a premium for writing the option.

Which strategy has lower risk?

The risk profiles for covered calls and cash-secured puts are generally considered to be the safest among options strategies. However, since I’m obligated to buy the shares with cash-secured puts, it’s vulnerable to the stock’s potential decline in value. On the other hand, with covered calls, my downside risk is limited to the decrease in value of my existing shares. That said, both strategies aim to mitigate risks, and the ultimate risk level depends on the specific stock or ETF and the strike price.

Which gives higher returns?

When it comes to potential returns, both strategies can provide income from the premiums collected. The actual returns, however, will depend on various factors such as the stock’s performance, strike price, and the time until expiration. No strategy guarantees higher returns, as each situation is unique and dependent on market conditions.

How do they impact taxes?

Taxes can impact both covered calls and cash-secured puts, specifically on the premiums received and the sale of shares. In general, short-term capital gains rates apply to the income derived from premiums if the holding period is less than a year. If the options are exercised, the tax implications will vary depending on whether I’m selling shares through a covered call or buying shares via a cash-secured put. It’s a good idea to consult a tax professional for advice on the specific tax consequences for each strategy.

Can they be combined effectively?

Yes, combining covered calls and cash-secured puts can be an effective strategy for generating income and managing risk. By employing both selling strategies together, I can take advantage of multiple sources of income while keeping track of any potential losses. However, it’s essential to maintain a balanced portfolio to prevent overexposure to a single stock or sector.

What are typical timeframes?

The timeframe for covered calls and cash-secured puts depends on the specific option contracts chosen. Generally, options contracts have expiration dates ranging from weekly to monthly or even longer terms. It’s important to choose a suitable expiration date based on my specific goals, risk tolerance, and market outlook. Shorter timeframes may involve faster premium decay and increased management, while longer timeframes provide more time for stock appreciation but may have lower premium returns.

Kevin S

Kevin S

Greetings, I'm Kevin! I am now a full time options trader and investor. I am thrilled to have the opportunity to share my knowledge and expertise with you. My objective is to assist you in navigating the complexities of option trading, regardless of whether you're a beginner or an experienced trader looking to enhance your skills. I'm excited to accompany you on your journey to mastering the art of option trading. Let's make this year an extraordinary one for you!

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Kevin S

Kevin S

Greetings, I'm Kevin! I am now a full time options trader and investor. I am thrilled to have the opportunity to share my knowledge and expertise with you. My objective is to assist you in navigating the complexities of option trading, regardless of whether you're a beginner or an experienced trader looking to enhance your skills. I'm excited to accompany you on your journey to mastering the art of option trading. Let's make this year an extraordinary one for you!

About DividendOnFire.com

Welcome to Dividend On Fire, we are a site dedicated to options trading! We specialize in helping investors generate passive weekly or monthly income through selling cash secured puts and covered calls.

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